The Incognito mode is a browsing mode within the Chrome browser which allow web users to surf the net without the recording of their browsing history, and thus serve as a blockade to low-level tracking techniques.

While Incognito Mode can't be classified as an anonymity tool, it does offer a new window that's more like a newly installed browser in which there are no cookies, no bookmarks, no saved history and pre-filled forms.

But there is a loophole in Chrome that allow some websites to shut down users trying to slip past count meters via Incognito Mode, whereby they monitor an API that's automatically disabled in Incognito Mode; Google has followed suit to shut down the ability of sites to sniff out Incognito Mode through the API.

Since the FileSystem API leave traces of activity on someone’s device, websites can check for the availability of the FileSystem API to determine if a private session is occurring, now Chrome’s FileSystem API have been disabled in Incognito Mode to avoid leaving any traces of activity.

Another Chrome update in the Progressive Web Apps (PWA) support which mimics the experience of traditional apps, through the caching of a version on the device for offline use, that even if you don’t have an internet connection, you can still be able to use the web service, as locally-installed software with the flexibility of online services.

Google will simplify the installation of PWA with Chrome 76, that when the distributing website meets the PWA install criteria, the browser will display a small icon at the right edge of the address bar; and on clicking the icon initiates the PWA installation process.

The bringing of PWA to the forefront, means that Google will be raising more awareness of the standard, and as the line between traditional apps and web pages continue to get blurred, PWA will be fully supported on more modern browsers for better user experience.

Google closes loophole in Chrome Incognito Mode and simplifies PWA installation



The Incognito mode is a browsing mode within the Chrome browser which allow web users to surf the net without the recording of their browsing history, and thus serve as a blockade to low-level tracking techniques.

While Incognito Mode can't be classified as an anonymity tool, it does offer a new window that's more like a newly installed browser in which there are no cookies, no bookmarks, no saved history and pre-filled forms.

But there is a loophole in Chrome that allow some websites to shut down users trying to slip past count meters via Incognito Mode, whereby they monitor an API that's automatically disabled in Incognito Mode; Google has followed suit to shut down the ability of sites to sniff out Incognito Mode through the API.

Since the FileSystem API leave traces of activity on someone’s device, websites can check for the availability of the FileSystem API to determine if a private session is occurring, now Chrome’s FileSystem API have been disabled in Incognito Mode to avoid leaving any traces of activity.

Another Chrome update in the Progressive Web Apps (PWA) support which mimics the experience of traditional apps, through the caching of a version on the device for offline use, that even if you don’t have an internet connection, you can still be able to use the web service, as locally-installed software with the flexibility of online services.

Google will simplify the installation of PWA with Chrome 76, that when the distributing website meets the PWA install criteria, the browser will display a small icon at the right edge of the address bar; and on clicking the icon initiates the PWA installation process.

The bringing of PWA to the forefront, means that Google will be raising more awareness of the standard, and as the line between traditional apps and web pages continue to get blurred, PWA will be fully supported on more modern browsers for better user experience.

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