The Blockchain technology has caught the attention of the Internet's largest services providers including: IBM, HP, Microsoft, Oracle, SAP and now, Amazon has also joined the list of Blockchain-as-a-Service (BaaS) providers.

Amazon BaaS offerings is meant to address the shortage of in-house Blockchain developers, which services are still in hot demand, by offering means to allow customers test the emerging technology without the associated risk of deploying it in-house.

While Blockchain has the potential to unleash new possibilities that were formerly out of reach for many small organizations, with such unique services advantage as decentralization, secure, transparent, and immutable interactions, for processes and transactions.

ConsenSys is an AWS Partner Network (APN) Advanced Technology Partner that is enabling associations of two or more companies to launch and operate enterprise Blockchain networks on Amazon Web Services (AWS) without spending months and millions of dollars writing the code.

Amazon has also partnered with Kaleido to offer its cloud services on which to host an Enterprise Ethereum-based, open-source blockchain platform, which makes Kaleido the first managed blockchain SaaS on AWS; available in AWS regions across the world.

Additionally, AWS announced blockchain developer templates based on Ethereum and Hyperledger – which are the most popular business-grade, open-source blockchain platforms.

Microsoft became one of the first software vendors to offer BaaS on its Azure cloud platform back in 2015; with the Azure Cloud open to a variety of blockchain protocols, supporting simple Unspent Transaction Output-based protocols (UTXO), Smart Contract-based protocols, and other newly developed protocols.

And IBM followed suit by launching a number of pilot projects with supply chain and financial services companies.

The IBM's Blockchain Platform, is a cloud-based service that enable the electronic exchange of 12 different currencies across Pacific Islands as well as Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

Backed by the KlickEx Group, a United Nations-funded, Pacific-region financial services firm, and Stellar.org, a nonprofit organization that supports an open-source blockchain network for financial services, the IBM's platform also allow consumers in developing nations to transfer funds directly to mobile wallets.

Albeit, Amazon's model is a bit more centralized, but it's still very much a distributed ledger system; more accessible and easier for customers to use, and even faster for them to connect to AWS services securely.

Amazon's foray into blockchain-as-a-service (BaaS) with AWS offerings



The Blockchain technology has caught the attention of the Internet's largest services providers including: IBM, HP, Microsoft, Oracle, SAP and now, Amazon has also joined the list of Blockchain-as-a-Service (BaaS) providers.

Amazon BaaS offerings is meant to address the shortage of in-house Blockchain developers, which services are still in hot demand, by offering means to allow customers test the emerging technology without the associated risk of deploying it in-house.

While Blockchain has the potential to unleash new possibilities that were formerly out of reach for many small organizations, with such unique services advantage as decentralization, secure, transparent, and immutable interactions, for processes and transactions.

ConsenSys is an AWS Partner Network (APN) Advanced Technology Partner that is enabling associations of two or more companies to launch and operate enterprise Blockchain networks on Amazon Web Services (AWS) without spending months and millions of dollars writing the code.

Amazon has also partnered with Kaleido to offer its cloud services on which to host an Enterprise Ethereum-based, open-source blockchain platform, which makes Kaleido the first managed blockchain SaaS on AWS; available in AWS regions across the world.

Additionally, AWS announced blockchain developer templates based on Ethereum and Hyperledger – which are the most popular business-grade, open-source blockchain platforms.

Microsoft became one of the first software vendors to offer BaaS on its Azure cloud platform back in 2015; with the Azure Cloud open to a variety of blockchain protocols, supporting simple Unspent Transaction Output-based protocols (UTXO), Smart Contract-based protocols, and other newly developed protocols.

And IBM followed suit by launching a number of pilot projects with supply chain and financial services companies.

The IBM's Blockchain Platform, is a cloud-based service that enable the electronic exchange of 12 different currencies across Pacific Islands as well as Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

Backed by the KlickEx Group, a United Nations-funded, Pacific-region financial services firm, and Stellar.org, a nonprofit organization that supports an open-source blockchain network for financial services, the IBM's platform also allow consumers in developing nations to transfer funds directly to mobile wallets.

Albeit, Amazon's model is a bit more centralized, but it's still very much a distributed ledger system; more accessible and easier for customers to use, and even faster for them to connect to AWS services securely.

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