ECPA Reform: Why it's necessary to Protect the Privacy of Online Communications?

The Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) enacted in 1986 specified protocols allowing law enforcements access to electronic communications with it's associated data, which now importantly portends privacy concerns to emerging wireless and Internet technologies subscribers.

Albeit, the original intent was to protect the privacy of online communications, an approach for the time when very few Americans used the email systems, however as the Internet evolves into more business and personal hub of information systems, the law did not evolve as well.

Meanwhile, Internet technology has advanced drastically since 1986, and the ECPA has been proportionally stagnated.

As the ECPA specifications can no longer cover the vast amount of personal information generated by today’s digital communication services, its application, consequently, can no longer offer adequate protection.

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, yesterday held a hearing on reforming the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA), with the intent to introduce legislation that would bring the ECPA in line with the realities of the digital age.

And given that America strategically dictates the norm for protecting online communications, necessitates that the U.S. Congress pass the ECPA Amendments Act and Email Privacy Act.

The ECPA reform may perhaps transcend the Geo-political line, as amending the ECPA is an issue that has brought all civil agencies like the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) together to fight on behalf of all Americans to strengthen privacy protections online.
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